www.locriantica.it

LOCRI EPIZEPHYRII



Salvatore La Rosa
WWW.LOCRIANTICA.IT Welcome to Magna Graecia ARCHAEOLOGICAL SITE


ROMAN VILLAS IN THE TERRITORY OF ANCIENT LOCRI
     
 

The events which involved Locri Epizephyrii during the III century b.C. (see History) and that caused a substantial economic and demographic downsizing of its urban core, contributed to begin a process of development of settlements spread across the territory.

Settlements that later, during the Roman Imperial period, in terms of economic and residential growth, took the lead over the city itself which, however, retained until the end its primacy in the administrative field.

The core of these new settlements was the Villa; located at the centre of a large landed estate it was composed by a group of buildings completely independent and with various functions. Its traditional structure was made up of a series of rooms dedicated to the accommodations and daily activities of the owner and his guests (pars urbana) and of a section devoted to the agricultural production with the presence of structures such as stables, barns, stores and other workplaces as well as the house of the vilicus (a servant of the owner who superintended over this part of the Villa) and his family (pars rustica).

The archaeological activity and some random discoveries led to the identification of various examples of such settlements in the area; definitely the most important are the Villa at Palazzi di Casignana and the Villa of "Naniglio" in Gioiosa Jonica. Another well-known site is the one of the (supposed) Villa to which belonged the Roman Theatre of Marina di Gioiosa Jonica.

 
 

Among the lesser-known sites, of which remain very few ruins, we mention only the Villas at Ardore (Salìce and Giudeo districts) and the Villa at Bianco (S. Antonio district).

Another important residential complex, however, deserves a separate discussion: the late antique palatium at Quote San Francesco. Located not far from the walls of ancient Locri, the architectural structures of this site show the transition from the classical typology of the Roman Villa to a new one that, due to the changed needs of the society, will be the basic type from which will evolve the manor houses during the medieval age.

The discovery of such sites and the studies carried on by the archaeologists made it possible to see in a new light the Roman age, especially the imperial period, in the area of ancient Locri.

What, in fact, had long been considered an uninteristing period compared to the Greek age (due to a supposed lack of developments) appears today, instead, as a dinamic historical period during which the opulent refinement of the Roman aristocracy, who lived in this territory, transpired through the creation of monumental structures that had nothing to envy to similar sites built elsewhere in the Roman Empire.

 

The most important Roman Villas discovered in the territory of ancient Locri

THE MOST IMPORTANT ROMAN VILLAS DISCOVERED IN THE TERRITORY OF ANCIENT LOCRI

 
     
THE VILLA AT PALAZZI DI CASIGNANA
     

The ruins of the villa, discovered in 1963 as a result of works for the building of a new aqueduct, are approximately 14km south of the archaeological site of ancient Locri. The name of the place (Palazzi), that lies in the Municipality of Casignana, originates from the modern toponym of the area where such ruins have been unearthed; a common toponym for places which keep the memory of ancient vestiges now no longer visible.

The in-depth studies carried on the site in the last twenty years have allowed to date the first nucleus of the housing complex back to the middle of the first century a.D.; the gorgeous mosaic floors that have been brought back to light and which cover a total area of over 500 square metres (the largest example of Roman age mosaic floors in Calabria to date known) date back to the third century a.D. (characterized by large white and green mosaic tiles) and the fourth century a.D. (polychrome and made with small mosaic tiles).

Roman Villa At Palazzi Di Casignana - Room Of The Nereids, Mosaic Floor   Roman Villa At Palazzi Di Casignana - Room Of The Four Seasons, Mosaic Floor

PALAZZI DI CASIGNANA, EASTERN BATHS - FRIGIDARIUM
ROOM OF THE NEREIDS, MOSAIC FLOOR

 

PALAZZI DI CASIGNANA, RESIDENTIAL AREA
ROOM OF THE FOUR SEASONS, MOSAIC FLOOR

The whole Villa, of which have been explored over 50 rooms, is built around a large porticoed courtyard (40 metres x 24 metres), located at the center of the structure, which gives access to the various areas of the complex; the eastern side leads to the real residential nucleus, with its monumental structures built close to the coastal line (and whose study is made difficult by the presence of the State Road 106 that crosses it and separates it from the rest of the Villa's structures), the southern side leads to a series of service areas, the northern side (partly occupied by a modern structure) has not yet been completely explored while the western side is characterized by the Villa's baths system.

The latter, divided into two sectors with identical functions (the Western Baths and the Eastern Baths, as the archaeologists have named them), shows, in both sectors, all the typical layouts of the Roman baths: frigidarium, tepidarium and calidarium as well as other rooms with even more peculiar functions such as the laconicum (or sudatorium, a sweating-room). Particularly interesting is the system through which the baths (and some adjacent rooms) were heated and that it's still clearly identifiable nowadays and perceptible in all its individual parts such as the praefurnia (underground furnaces used to heat the warm and the hot rooms), the hypocausts with suspensurae (an heating system that allowed the circulation of hot air under the rooms thanks to a suspended floor built over small pillars made up of overlaid bricks with a square or circular cross-section) and the tubules (box-flues tiles, set into rooms walls, with a square or rectangular cross-section, that allowed the circulation of hot air coming from the hypocaust in the walls).

Roman Villa At Palazzi Di Casignana - Calidarium, Mosaic Floor   Roman Villa At Palazzi Di Casignana - Calidarium, Semicircular Tub

PALAZZI DI CASIGNANA, WESTERN BATHS - CALIDARIUM
MOSAIC FLOOR WITH GEOMETRIC MOTIFS

 

PALAZZI DI CASIGNANA, EASTERN BATHS - CALIDARIUM
SEMICIRCULAR TUB

The Villa, which due to the richness, the quality and the state of conservation of the structures that have been brought back to light, is one of the most important Roman archaeological complexes in southern Italy, reached its maximum splendor and maximum expansion at the beginning of the fourth century a.D., constituting a small settlement of about 5000 square metres; dimensions that have led the experts to think of it as a statio (which some scholars identify with the Altanum handed down in the Itinerarium Provinciarum Antonini Augusti) placed along the road that ran along the Ionian coast of Brutium. Its abandonment and the termination of what were its functions dates back to the first half of the fifth century a.D., while a frequentation and reuse of some of its rooms is attestable until the seventh century a.D.

     
THE VILLA OF NANIGLIO
     
 

The archaeological area of the Villa of Naniglio is located on the lower terraces of the hills sloping towards the coast (it must have been a really panoramic location during the roman age, since it overlooks the Torbido river valley with the sea few kilometres away) in the municipality of Gioiosa Jonica, Annunziata district, about 18km north of the archaeological site of the ancient Locri.

The exploration of the area and the study of the structures brought to light until now place the construction of the first nucleus of the residential complex between the end of the first century a.D. and the beginnings of the II century a.D.; during the following period the architectural complex continued to be extended until the IV-V century a.D. when it was hit by a natural event (probably a flood) that caused its complete abandonment. It is however conceivable, thanks to some findings of ceramic material dating back to a period between the VI century a.D. and the IX century a.D., a frequentation of at least some of its buildings even in the centuries immediately following its initial abandonment.

Among the best preserved structures of the archaeological area (and, certainly, among the most suggestive archaeological places in Calabria) is the hypogeum room called "Naniglio" (from which derives the modern name of the Villa). Dating back to the II-III century a.D., it is a large, rectangular (10 metres x 17 metres), underground room, preserved in its entirety, divided into three naves by eight pillars on which is set a system of groin-vaults in opus caementicium that covers the entire room. The term Naniglio, probably of medieval origin, derives from the Byzantine Greek
ἀνήλιος (anelios, without sun) and is perfectly fit for this structure, whose main function was probably that of a cistern for water collecting.

Roman Villa Of Naniglio - Current Entrance To Naniglio   Roman Villa Of Naniglio - The Inside Of Naniglio

NANIGLIO - THE CURRENT ENTRANCE THROUGH THE ADJOINING STRUCTURE

 

NANIGLIO - THE INSIDE

La struttura del Naniglio è completata da un avancorpo, edificato in una fase successiva su uno dei lati brevi della sala ipogea, che funge oggigiorno anche da accesso alla sala stessa non essendo più praticabile (ma, comunque, ancora visibile) l'originaria scala a chiocciola che consentiva l'accesso dall'alto alla cisterna. Tale avancorpo è costituito da due piccoli vani coperti da volte a botte. Di particolare interesse, nel vano est, la presenza di un'edicola votiva e di un altare con tracce di decorazioni; particolari, questi, che permettono di ipotizzare la funzione di ninfeo di tale ambiente.

Roman Villa Of Naniglio - Naniglio Adjoining Structure, Western Room   Roman Villa Of Naniglio - Naniglio Adjoining Structure, Eastern Room

NANIGLIO - ADJOINING STRUCTURE, WESTERN ROOM

 

NANIGLIO - ADJOINING STRUCTURE, EASTERN ROOM

Ad est del Naniglio, la cui struttura si colloca in posizione centrale rispetto all'intera area archeologica, sono stati riportati alla luce i resti di quelli che furono gli ambienti termali della Villa; mentre sul lato ovest sono ancora oggi apprezzabili vari ambienti appartenenti all'area residenziale del complesso, tra i quali alcuni con pavimentazione musiva (realizzata tra la seconda metà del II sec. d.C. e gli inizi del III sec. d.C.) a motivi prevalentemente geometrici.

Roman Villa Of Naniglio - Residential Area, Rooms   Roman Villa Of Naniglio - Residential Area, Mosaic Floor

VILLA OF NANIGLIO, RESIDENTIAL AREA - ROOMS

 

VILLA OF NANIGLIO, RESIDENTIAL AREA - MOSAIC FLOOR

La maggior parte dell'area archeologica della Villa del Naniglio rimane ancora da esplorare e quanto riportato finora alla luce, con le campagne di scavo degli anni ottanta e del 2010-2011, lascia facilmente immaginare le ricchezze di questo complesso monumentale che ancora si celano nel sottosuolo.

 
     
THE ROMAN THEATRE OF MARINA DI GIOIOSA JONICA
     
 

Il teatro romano di Marina di Gioiosa Jonica si trova a circa 12km a nord del parco archeologico dell'antica Locri. Collocato nel tessuto urbano dell'abitato moderno della cittadina jonica esso risale al III-IV sec. d.C. e, con molta probabilità, apparteneva ad una Villa o ad una statio (Subsicivo?) sviluppatasi in età imperiale in quell'area.

Dell'edificio, ancora oggi utilizzato per manifestazioni di vario genere, sono chiaramente identificabili le tipiche strutture del teatro quali la cavea, l'orchestra e l'impianto scenico. La cavea, in particolare, costruita non più come in epoca greca su un pendio naturale ma su un terreno pianeggiante, è costituita da una serie di muretti concentrici che, in antichità, dovevano essere rivestiti in lastre di pietra sulle quali trovavano posto gli spettatori. Sulla base dei calcoli effettuati dagli studiosi, che ritengono che in passato la cavea fosse composta da una serie di venti muretti concentrici, la capienza massima del teatro poteva raggiungere le 1200 persone.

Roman Theatre - Cavea and, in the foreground, the Stage   Tower Of Cavallaro (XVI century A.D.)

MARINA DI GIOIOSA JONICA - ROMAN THEATRE

 

MARINA DI GIOIOSA JONICA - TOWER OF CAVALLARO (XVI CENTURY A.D.)

Di fronte al teatro, oltrepassata la linea ferroviaria, si trova una torre di avvistamento del XVI secolo (Torre del Cavallaro) nei dintorni della quale, negli anni venti del secolo scorso, vennero condotti alcuni saggi di scavo che portarono alla scoperta di vari ambienti identificati come appartenenti ad un edficio termale di età imperiale. Tali strutture, oggi non più visibili in quanto nuovamente interrate subito dopo lo scavo, avvalorano l'ipotesi della presenza nell'area di una villa (o di una statio) e fanno presumere l'esistenza nella zona di ulteriori strutture di epoca romana.

 
     
THE LATE ANTIQUE PALATIUM AT QUOTE SAN FRANCESCO
     
 

Poco al di fuori della cinta muraria dell'antica Locri, in località Quote San Francesco del comune di Portigliola, sorgono i resti di un complesso di edifici il cui nucleo originario si può far risalire alla seconda metà del V secolo d.C.

Si tratta di una particolare tipologia abitativa che riprende i canoni classici della Villa romana la quale, completamente autonoma e posta al centro di un'ampia porzione di terreno, svolge le funzioni di luogo di residenza del proprietario e, al tempo stesso, di centro di produzione e gestione delle attività agricole del territorio che la circonda. Ma, rispetto alla Villa classica, le strutture di Quote San Francesco presentano una peculiarità tipica degli edifici padronali di epoca medievale: la compattezza e la chiusura verso il mondo esterno. L'esatto opposto, quindi, della Villa romana che con i suoi ambienti porticati si apriva sul territorio che la circondava e con esso si integrava.

Tale fondamentale differenza è dettata dal particolare periodo storico durante il quale l'area di Quote San Francesco si sviluppa; un periodo di transizione, derivante dal definitivo collasso dell'Impero Romano d'Occidente, in cui diventa indispensabile considerare l'aspetto difensivo durante la realizzazione degli ambienti destinati ad ospitare il dominus e la sua famiglia.

Oggigiorno il Palatium, di cui si sono conservate strutture murarie che raggiungono i 4 metri di altezza, si presenta come un complesso abitativo nel quale possono essere identificati due nuclei principali: quello residenziale, che in origine doveva svilupparsi su due livelli, e quello termale.

Dagli studi effettuati e dai reperti fino ad oggi riportati alla luce è stato possibile determinare che l'area di Quote San Francesco continuò a svilupparsi e ad essere abitata fino al VII-VIII sec. d.C., periodo che coincide con il definitivo abbandono della costa da parte degli ultimi abitanti del territorio dell'antica Locri causato dal diffondersi della malaria e dall'incremento delle incursioni arabe. Tuttavia l'area archeologica, ancora oggi, può dirsi solo parzialmente esplorata e unicamente con nuove campagne di scavo si potranno ottenere ulteriori informazioni, fondamentali per meglio comprendere le vicende che hanno interessato questo singolare (quanto unico, per il panorama tardoantico calabrese) complesso residenziale.

 
 
All the photos of this page are copyright © Salvatore La Rosa and can be used only with the written authorization of the copyright owner.
For more information please consult the
Copyright Notice or write to info@locriantica.it
 
 

 

 

Back to the top of the page
BACK TO THE TOP


Valid HTML 4.01!                     Valid CSS 2.1!

 
Privacy Policy  -  Cookie Policy